Home > Reviews > 1/48 > Accurate Armour 1/48 scale Austin K2Y British Heavy Ambulance (K48001)

Austin K2Y Ambulance

Accurate Armour, 1/48 scale

 

 

Catalogue Number and Description: Accurate Armour item no. K48001 - Austin K2Y British Heavy Ambulance
Contents and Media: 68 parts in grey resin; 36 parts on one large photo-etched fret; clear acetate sheet for glazing; plastic rod; decals
Scale: 1/48
Price: from 42.51 available online from Accurate Armour's website
Review Type: FirstLook
Advantages: Versatile crossover subject for both military and aircraft modellers; very high quality casting; excellent detailing inside and out; convincing surface textures; full-colour instruction booklet; includes many decal options.
Disadvantages: Some pinholes on main lower body.
Recommendation: Highly Recommended for experienced modellers


Accurate Armour's 1/48 scale Austin Ambulance is available online from Mission Models

FirstLook

Accurate Armour has released its first four 1/48 scale vehicle kits. The subject of tonight's review, an Austin K2Y British Heavy Ambulance, is a versatile crossover subject that will be ideal to appear on an airfield for aircraft modellers, or accompanying a line of armour and infantry in a military diorama.

Accurate Armour has a well-earned reputation for superb detail and high-quality casting in 1/35 scale. This 1/48 scale release continues those traditions.

Their 1/48 scale Austin K2Y comprises 68 parts in the familiar grey-green coloured resin, a large photo-etched fret with an additional 36 parts, a sheet of clear acetate for the windscreens, a length of styrene rod and a busy decal sheet with markings for Army, RAF and even a civilian ambulance.

 

 

Casting quality is generally excellent. The only imperfections on my sample were some pinholes and air bubbles on the main lower body part immediately behind the bumper bar, on one of the mudguards and along the ridge for the driver's cab rear bulkhead. The latter will be hidden once the model is assembled, and the other areas can be easily dealt with using Milliput or a similar filler.

The large parts are cast onto resin strips. These will help keep the parts straight (all of my parts were completely free of warpage), and should be quick to remove using a razor saw.

The vehicle castings are thoroughly detailed, with structural features cast onto the inside of the cab and the bottom of the chassis.

 

 

The smaller parts are equally impressive. Surface textures are subtle and convincing. I especially like the slightly battered fuel tanks and the lovely cloth texture on top of the stretchers.

Engine and full drive train detail are also supplied.

These resin parts are supplemented with 36 photo-etched parts on a large fret. These include rear steps, mudflaps, engine side panels (which may be left off or posed open to display the engine) and sundry detail items.

A clear acetate sheet is supplied for the photo-etched split windscreen frame.

The package is rounded out with a large decal sheet including marking options for the RAF, British Army and a civilian ambulance. Alternative parts are supplied for the civilian driver's seat and air cleaner.

 

 

Parts breakdown is logical, so assembly should not present any problems to modellers who have previous experience with resin kits or accessories.



Conclusion

I was delighted to hear the announcement about this series a few months ago, and I am even more pleased now that the kit's contents are sprawled over my desk.

It is always nice to see another British subject on the modelling scene. This versatile subject  will be warmly welcomed by 1/48 scale modellers everywhere, whether their preference is armour or aircraft.

Accurate Armour has brought their customary quality and high level of detail to this 1/48 scale Austin K2Y Ambulance. It will look great as either a stand alone model, or as part of a larger diorama.

Highly Recommended.

Thanks to Derek Hanson and Frank Berger for the sample


Accurate Armour products are available from their website

In the USA, Accurate Armour products are also available from Mission Models Website

Text and Images by Brett Green
Page Created 04 November, 2006
Page Last Updated 17 February, 2007